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T-SQL Tuesday Retrospective #005: Reporting

A few weeks ago, I began answering every single T-SQL Tuesday from the beginning. This week it’s the fifth entry, and on April 5th, 2010, Aaron Nelson invited us to write about reporting. You can visit the previous entries here: T-SQL Tuesday #001 – Date/Time Tricks T-SQL Tuesday #002 – A Puzzling Situation T-SQL Tuesday
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Setting yourself up for online streaming success, PASS Virtual Summit style

Last week I presented on three separate occasions during what is considered the biggest Microsoft Data Platform conference of the year, the PASS Summit: Full-day pre-conference session Speaker Idol panel discussion 75-minute general session On account of the COVID-19 global pandemic going on right now the conference went virtual, which meant a lot of new
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T-SQL Tuesday Retrospective #004: I/O

Mike Walsh invited us on March 1st 2010 to write about I/O. This abbreviation stands for Input / Output, and is often used as shorthand for persisted storage. Given the breadth of the topic I decided to write about RAID levels, but I must state outright that RAID is not a backup. A Redundant Array
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The rule of three, SQL Server on Linux edition

When it comes to Microsoft products, the rule of three — at least as far as I’m concerned — is where you can accomplish the same task in three different ways. The go-to example is Microsoft Word, where you can use the ribbon toolbar, a keyboard shortcut, or the context menu to perform the same
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friends

T-SQL Tuesday Retrospective #003: Relationships

In my quest to respond to every T-SQL Tuesday since the dawn of the end of 2009, it was only a matter of time before Rob Farley’s name came up. I first met Rob at his 40th birthday party, many (many!) years ago at the PASS Summit. He of course has no recollection of this
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think outside the box

T-SQL Tuesday Retrospective #002: A Puzzling Situation

For the second T-SQL Tuesday ever — again, hosted by Adam Machanic — we were asked one of three options, and I elected to go with the first one: Describe a confusing situation you encountered, and explain how you debugged the problem and what the resolution was. This invitation was originally posted on 4 January
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The T-SQL Tuesday Corollary

T-SQL Tuesday is a fantastic series of blog posts derived from over 130 topics over the past 11 years, inviting bloggers to share their thoughts on a particular theme once a month. I’ve even participated in a couple of them myself. Unfortunately, I keep missing the deadline, plus my blog publishes every Wednesday which is
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A screenshot of Gmail

A more considered approach to email signatures

This — like last week’s post — is not about SQL Server or Azure SQL Database. In a way, it hearkens back to a post I wrote a few years ago about what it means to be professional. You’re probably doing email signatures wrong This week I’m talking about email signatures. Specifically, three qualities that you
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A Windows error message

Read the error message

This post is brought to you — indirectly — from a boss I loved working for, on a project which almost killed me, at a company which I had to walk away from to restore my mental health. I learned a great many things from my boss (and yes, we are still friends). I learned
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messy paint cans and colours

How SQL Server stores data types: sql_variant

This post looks at a curious data type that isn’t really a data type. Instead, sql_variant tries to be all things to all people. As with most things in life, it has a few shortcomings as a result. If you would like to read about storage of other data types, here are the previous posts
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