Gatekeeping and the lack of diversity in the workplace

Recently I have become more vocal on Twitter and on my personal blog about my social activism. For the record, I have been an activist for LGBTQIA+ rights since 2001, so if this comes as a surprise to anyone, you haven’t been paying attention. This activism gives me a unique opportunity in my roles as
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Convert legacy password storage without aggravating your users

In a previous post I wrote about storing password hashes in a database, which raises the question of how to convert an existing legacy password storage system to use hashes (or even no passwords!) without annoying the people who use your system. Dial ‘S’ for Secret Let’s assume that you have inherited a database which stores passwords
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Using AzCopy with Batch Files and Task Scheduler

As regular readers of this blog will know, I’m a big fan of AzCopy, especially now that it has a sync option to keep local data synchronized with blob storage. In a recent release of the tool, Microsoft introduced a new switch to ensure that old files are only flushed from the destination when using
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Accelerated Database Recovery in SQL Server 2019: Choose your own filegroup for the version store

An exciting new feature in SQL Server 2019 is Accelerated Database Recovery (ADR). Resulting from a combination of magic beans and smart software developers (I might be wrong about the beans), there is a good chance that you will find yourself using it. Not only can ADR dramatically improve recovery time with database restores, but
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How to really store a password in a database

Recently I wrote: Don’t store passwords in a database. I stand by this statement. I expected a lot of flak because I didn’t explain myself. This post goes into a bit of an explanation of my position, as well as how to go about storing something in a database that can be used for authenticating
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Gatekeeping and why language matters

This is the second in a series of posts about gatekeeping in Information Technology and other fields. Negative terminology The language we use matters. In the first post I wrote that a number of words we use by convention need to be phased out, especially if they have negative connotations. I used Michele’s example of
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The importance of backups

I have been selected to present a second session for the PASS Summit in November this year. I wrote a few weeks ago about the Linux Learning Path and being a part of that, so I was certainly not expecting this. My second topic is about backing up, testing, and restoring SQL Server backups if
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All the signs were there, but we didn’t understand them: an essay on gatekeeping in IT

This is the first in a series of posts about gatekeeping in Information Technology and other fields. I am not the first — nor will I be the last — to say that the terminology we use in the technology sphere is problematic. Language and gender bias Let’s look at several tweets collected in the
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Better SQL Server memory defaults in 2019

In 2016 I created the Max Server Memory Matrix as a guide for configuring the maximum amount of memory that should be assigned to SQL Server, using an algorithm developed by Jonathan Kehayias. SQL Server 2019 is still in preview as I write this, but I wanted to point out a new feature that Microsoft has
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