Setting yourself up for online streaming success, PASS Virtual Summit style

Last week I presented on three separate occasions during what is considered the biggest Microsoft Data Platform conference of the year, the PASS Summit: Full-day pre-conference session Speaker Idol panel discussion 75-minute general session On account of the COVID-19 global pandemic going on right now the conference went virtual, which meant a lot of new
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T-SQL Tuesday Retrospective #004: I/O

Mike Walsh invited us on March 1st 2010 to write about I/O. This abbreviation stands for Input / Output, and is often used as shorthand for persisted storage. Given the breadth of the topic I decided to write about RAID levels, but I must state outright that RAID is not a backup. A Redundant Array
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The rule of three, SQL Server on Linux edition

When it comes to Microsoft products, the rule of three — at least as far as I’m concerned — is where you can accomplish the same task in three different ways. The go-to example is Microsoft Word, where you can use the ribbon toolbar, a keyboard shortcut, or the context menu to perform the same
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friends

T-SQL Tuesday Retrospective #003: Relationships

In my quest to respond to every T-SQL Tuesday since the dawn of the end of 2009, it was only a matter of time before Rob Farley’s name came up. I first met Rob at his 40th birthday party, many (many!) years ago at the PASS Summit. He of course has no recollection of this
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think outside the box

T-SQL Tuesday Retrospective #002: A Puzzling Situation

For the second T-SQL Tuesday ever — again, hosted by Adam Machanic — we were asked one of three options, and I elected to go with the first one: Describe a confusing situation you encountered, and explain how you debugged the problem and what the resolution was. This invitation was originally posted on 4 January
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The T-SQL Tuesday Corollary

T-SQL Tuesday is a fantastic series of blog posts derived from over 130 topics over the past 11 years, inviting bloggers to share their thoughts on a particular theme once a month. I’ve even participated in a couple of them myself. Unfortunately, I keep missing the deadline, plus my blog publishes every Wednesday which is
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A screenshot of Gmail

A more considered approach to email signatures

This — like last week’s post — is not about SQL Server or Azure SQL Database. In a way, it hearkens back to a post I wrote a few years ago about what it means to be professional. You’re probably doing email signatures wrong This week I’m talking about email signatures. Specifically, three qualities that you
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A Windows error message

Read the error message

This post is brought to you — indirectly — from a boss I loved working for, on a project which almost killed me, at a company which I had to walk away from to restore my mental health. I learned a great many things from my boss (and yes, we are still friends). I learned
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messy paint cans and colours

How SQL Server stores data types: sql_variant

This post looks at a curious data type that isn’t really a data type. Instead, sql_variant tries to be all things to all people. As with most things in life, it has a few shortcomings as a result. If you would like to read about storage of other data types, here are the previous posts
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chain and padlock

A new malware attack on SQL Server

Tencent Security has released a report (written in Chinese) describing a new malware attack by the name of “MrbMiner” on SQL Server instances exposed to the Internet with passwords that can be brute-forced. According to the report it installs an application written in C# by the name of assm.exe which communicates with a command-and-control server to download a digital
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