Containers and data: you gotta keep ’em separated

There was an interesting conversation on Twitter recently, between Grant Fritchey (blog | twitter), Kenneth Fisher (blog | twitter), Anthony E. Nocentino (blog | twitter), Vicky Harp (twitter), and me about containers and SQL Server. Here’s the summary tweet: Already mentioned, you can use a persisted storage volume to keep your databases around (thanks @_randolph_west
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My IT department installed an antivirus with SQL Server

Time for another short blog post, and this one combines two topics I am very passionate about: security, and SQL Server performance. Let’s start by talking about “antivirus” and what that means in today’s world. The term antivirus (AV) itself is outdated; traditionally, AV products detected malicious activity through fixed patterns of code or patterns
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PASS Summit 2019

Speaking at PASS Summit 2019

I am delighted to announce that I have been selected to speak at the largest Microsoft Data Platform conference in the world, PASS Summit 2019, in Seattle WA, USA. As our database community has extended beyond SQL Server into Azure and other platforms, there’s a lot to take in over the course of three days
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Proposed SQL Server defaults: optimize for ad hoc workloads

A few months ago I suggested that the following settings should be the default for most SQL Server instances: Set cost threshold for parallelism to 50 Disable lightweight pooling if it is enabled Disable priority boost if it is enabled Set optimize for ad hoc workloads to enabled Set max server memory (MB) to a
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SQL Server on Linux – feature change in Pacemaker 1.1.18

Heads up for SQL Server on Linux folks using availability groups and Pacemaker. Pacemaker 1.1.18 has been out for a while now, but it’s worth mentioning that there was a behaviour change in how it fails-over a cluster. While the new behaviour is considered “correct”, it may affect you if you’ve configured availability groups on
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Proposed SQL Server defaults: disable priority boost

A few months ago I suggested that the following settings should be the default for most SQL Server instances: Set cost threshold for parallelism to 50 Disable lightweight pooling if it is enabled Disable priority boost if it is enabled Set optimize for ad hoc workloads to enabled Set max server memory (MB) to a
-> Continue reading Proposed SQL Server defaults: disable priority boost

Proposed SQL Server defaults: disable lightweight pooling

A few months ago I suggested that the following settings should be the default for most SQL Server instances. Set cost threshold for parallelism to 50 Disable lightweight pooling if it is enabled Disable priority boost if it is enabled Set optimize for ad hoc workloads to enabled Set max server memory (MB) to a
-> Continue reading Proposed SQL Server defaults: disable lightweight pooling

dbForge Studio logo

Database modelling in a post-SSMS world: dbForge Studio

A few months ago, Microsoft announced that SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) will no longer include the visual Database Diagrams feature from v18.0 onward. When releasing a new version of a product, Microsoft has the luxury of referencing usage statistics, and obviously this is an underused feature of SSMS. I was a little disappointed at
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chaos monkey

Infrastructure matters, even in the Cloud

I am still amused by terminology in the Information Technology field. Words like “Kubernetes,” “containers,” and the BASIC keywords PEEK and POKE, all bring a smile to my lips every time I read or say them. Equally amusing are marketing ideas, except they may have a little sting at the end when they become mythology.
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Some databases may show a NULL collation in the sys.databases DMV

While working on my Swart’s Ten Percent Rule post last week, I needed to test the Windows version of the script on my SQL Server 2016 instance. Just before removing all the databases, I noticed something interesting when querying the sys.databases Dynamic Management View (DMV). Because the process I had come up with involved setting
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