Better SQL Server memory defaults in 2019

In 2016 I created the Max Server Memory Matrix as a guide for configuring the maximum amount of memory that should be assigned to SQL Server, using an algorithm developed by Jonathan Kehayias. SQL Server 2019 is still in preview as I write this, but I wanted to point out a new feature that Microsoft has
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Better SQL Server CPU defaults in 2019

SQL Server 2019 is still in preview as I write this, but I wanted to point out a new feature that Microsoft has added to SQL Server Setup, on the Windows version. On the Database Engine Configuration screen are two new tabs, called MaxDOP and Memory. These are both new configuration options for SQL Server
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SQL Server 2008 and 2008 R2 is end of life on 9 July 2019

Next month, Microsoft is ending five years of extended support on SQL Server 2008 and SQL Server 2008 R2. This follows five years of mainstream support before that. You really should be upgrading to SQL Server 2017 at the very least, with some serious consideration to the unreleased SQL Server 2019. My reasoning for suggesting
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Containers and data: you gotta keep ’em separated

There was an interesting conversation on Twitter recently, between Grant Fritchey (blog | twitter), Kenneth Fisher (blog | twitter), Anthony E. Nocentino (blog | twitter), Vicky Harp (twitter), and me about containers and SQL Server. Here’s the summary tweet: Already mentioned, you can use a persisted storage volume to keep your databases around (thanks @_randolph_west
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Speaking at SQLBits in March 2019

I have been selected to speak for a second time at SQLBits, which is being hosted in Manchester UK this year from 27 February to 2 March 2019. My session is called An overview of SQL Server 2019 for the busy DBA / developer. Here is the abstract: SQL Server 2019 is a major new
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Do you even PowerShell, bro? An ode to dbatools and dbachecks.

Shall I compare thee to Management Studio? Thou art more scriptable and consistent. Those out-of-memory errors do tend to lose hours of work. And I mean, SSMS doesn’t run from the command line. Sometimes I get those line-endings errors, Not to mention IntelliSense bombing out; And figuring out which tab I was in can be
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The cloud is not just someone else’s computer

A year ago, I wrote in a post that cloud computing is just someone else’s data center. I was wrong. Whether we like it or not, the cloud is more than just a bunch of 1s and 0s hosted on someone’s hardware. The problem with my statement was the word “just”. I’ve presented several times on
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SQL Server 2017 Administration Inside Out

For the last five months or so, I have been helping some really smart people put words on paper, both the physical and electronic kind, which is hopefully going to culminate in an actual technical book that I can point to and say “Yes, that’s the name I invented for myself when we moved to
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Compañero Conference and SQL Modernization Roadshow

October is a busy month for me. I am flying all over the US and Canada for speaking engagements to share some thoughts about migrating your SQL Server environment to the cloud (specifically Azure). Compañero Conference I will be presenting at the Compañero Conference, which takes place over two days, October 4 – 5 (that’s
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Should I upgrade SQL Server 2008 / R2, or migrate to Azure?

[Last updated July 13, 2018] Brent Ozar Unlimited runs a website called SQL Server Updates which comes in really handy for keeping your on-premises SQL Server up to date. In October 2016 I noticed something interesting: if you’re running SQL Server 2008 or 2008 R2, Microsoft’s extended support for it ends on 9 July 2019.
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