When the buffer pool isn’t just in memory

Last time we looked at the four major components of a computer system, and then looked at the SQL Server buffer pool as a way to leverage the best performance from computing hardware. Temperature Before we dive deeper into the buffer pool, I wanted to briefly mention data access terminology. A common metaphor for accessing
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Speaking at SQLBits in March 2019

I have been selected to speak for a second time at SQLBits, which is being hosted in Manchester UK this year from 27 February to 2 March 2019. My session is called An overview of SQL Server 2019 for the busy DBA / developer. Here is the abstract: SQL Server 2019 is a major new
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Flagrantly ignoring the 10% rule

My friend Michael J. Swart has a rule of thumb he calls Swart’s Ten Percent Rule. If you’re using over 10% of what SQL Server restricts you to, you’re doing it wrong. After a recent discussion on Twitter, I wondered what it would look like if I had 32,767 databases on one instance of SQL
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stacks of paper

Bulk insert issue with UTF-8 fixed-width file format

Fellow Canadian Doran Douglas brought this issue to my attention recently, and I wanted to share it with you as well. Let’s say you have a file in UTF-8 format. What this means is that some of the characters will be single-byte, and some may be more than that. Where this becomes problematic is that
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messy paint

Why you should not use SELECT *

A shorter post this week, but an important one. Last week, Erik Darling commented on my post saying that we shouldn’t use SELECT *, which was both amusing and accurate. Amusing, because a number of the example T-SQL queries in that post made use of this construct. Why not? Why was Erik’s comment accurate? A
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Dates and Times in SQL Server: T-SQL functions to get the current date and time

We have come on quite a journey so far. SQL Server and Azure SQL Database provide date and time data types to help you design the best possible database. You can read more about that here: Dates and Times in SQL Server: DATETIME Dates and Times in SQL Server: SMALLDATETIME Dates and Times in SQL
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Dates and Times in SQL Server: DATETIMEOFFSET

This post continues our look at date and time data types in SQL Server. SQL Server 2008 introduced new data types to handle dates and times in a more intelligent way than the DATETIME and SMALLDATETIME types that we looked at previously. This week, we look at the last new data type, DATETIMEOFFSET. If you’d like
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Dates and Times in SQL Server: DATETIME2

This post continues our look at date and time data types in SQL Server. SQL Server 2008 introduced new data types to handle dates and times in a more intelligent way than the DATETIME and SMALLDATETIME types that we looked at previously. This week, we look at the DATETIME2 data type. I’m not the first person
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Dates and Times in SQL Server: TIME

This post continues our look at date and time data types in SQL Server. SQL Server 2008 introduced new data types to handle dates and times in a more intelligent way than the DATETIME and SMALLDATETIME types that we looked at previously. What is the time? This week, we look at the TIME data type. It
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Calendar

Dates and Times in SQL Server: DATE

This post continues our look at date and time data types in SQL Server. SQL Server 2008 introduced new data types to handle dates and times in a more intelligent way than the DATETIME and SMALLDATETIME types that we looked at previously. The first one we look at this week is DATE. Whereas DATETIME uses eight
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