Accelerated Database Recovery in SQL Server 2019: Choose your own filegroup for the version store

An exciting new feature in SQL Server 2019 is Accelerated Database Recovery (ADR). Resulting from a combination of magic beans and smart software developers (I might be wrong about the beans), there is a good chance that you will find yourself using it. Not only can ADR dramatically improve recovery time with database restores, but
-> Continue reading Accelerated Database Recovery in SQL Server 2019: Choose your own filegroup for the version store

The importance of backups

I have been selected to present a second session for the PASS Summit in November this year. I wrote a few weeks ago about the Linux Learning Path and being a part of that, so I was certainly not expecting this. My second topic is about backing up, testing, and restoring SQL Server backups if
-> Continue reading The importance of backups

Containers and data: you gotta keep ’em separated

There was an interesting conversation on Twitter recently, between Grant Fritchey (blog | twitter), Kenneth Fisher (blog | twitter), Anthony E. Nocentino (blog | twitter), Vicky Harp (twitter), and me about containers and SQL Server. Here’s the summary tweet: Already mentioned, you can use a persisted storage volume to keep your databases around (thanks @_randolph_west
-> Continue reading Containers and data: you gotta keep ’em separated

My IT department installed an antivirus with SQL Server

Time for another short blog post, and this one combines two topics I am very passionate about: security, and SQL Server performance. Let’s start by talking about “antivirus” and what that means in today’s world. The term antivirus (AV) itself is outdated; traditionally, AV products detected malicious activity through fixed patterns of code or patterns
-> Continue reading My IT department installed an antivirus with SQL Server

Using a home-grown Azure Blob Storage solution for SQL Server backups

I’m here for the small organizations, the shops that can’t afford expensive solutions to maintain their environments. I’m here for them because that’s me: the one-person consultancy. I’ve built stuff that’s useful to me, and then made it available for free on GitHub. My first SQL Saturday session, way back in 2015, was the public
-> Continue reading Using a home-grown Azure Blob Storage solution for SQL Server backups

It’s a UNIX system. I know this.

Jurassic Park was a great film. Steven Spielberg brought technology into the film era in a major way with computer generated dinosaurs and some now-classic film lines, many of which came from Jeff “Dreamboat” Goldblum. One other line that seems to be making a comeback is the title of this post, uttered by the character
-> Continue reading It’s a UNIX system. I know this.

Proposed SQL Server defaults: disable lightweight pooling

A few months ago I suggested that the following settings should be the default for most SQL Server instances. Set cost threshold for parallelism to 50 Disable lightweight pooling if it is enabled Disable priority boost if it is enabled Set optimize for ad hoc workloads to enabled Set max server memory (MB) to a
-> Continue reading Proposed SQL Server defaults: disable lightweight pooling

When the buffer pool isn’t just in memory

Last time we looked at the four major components of a computer system, and then looked at the SQL Server buffer pool as a way to leverage the best performance from computing hardware. Temperature Before we dive deeper into the buffer pool, I wanted to briefly mention data access terminology. A common metaphor for accessing
-> Continue reading When the buffer pool isn’t just in memory

Speaking at SQLBits in March 2019

I have been selected to speak for a second time at SQLBits, which is being hosted in Manchester UK this year from 27 February to 2 March 2019. My session is called An overview of SQL Server 2019 for the busy DBA / developer. Here is the abstract: SQL Server 2019 is a major new
-> Continue reading Speaking at SQLBits in March 2019

Flagrantly ignoring the 10% rule

My friend Michael J. Swart has a rule of thumb he calls Swart’s Ten Percent Rule. If you’re using over 10% of what SQL Server restricts you to, you’re doing it wrong. After a recent discussion on Twitter, I wondered what it would look like if I had 32,767 databases on one instance of SQL
-> Continue reading Flagrantly ignoring the 10% rule